VA Refinance Recoupment Period

October 26th, 2020
calculator

With a VA loan, the United States Department of Veterans Affairs requires that the closing costs on a VA refinance be recouped in 36 months or less. If the recoupment period is over 36 months the loan will be rejected.

In other words, the refinance closing costs divided by the monthly savings has to be 36 or less, signifying the number of months in the recoupment period.

For example, if the closing costs on a VA refinance are $3,000 and the monthly savings on the refinance are $400 a month, the recoupment period is 7.5 months because $3,000 divided by $400 a month in savings = 7.5 (well within 36 months).

If the closing costs on a VA refinance are $3,000 and the monthly savings on the refinance are $200 a month, then the recoupment period is 15 months ($3,000 divided by $200 a month in savings = 15) which is within 36 months.

If the closing costs on a VA refinance are $5,000 and the monthly savings on the refinance are $125 a month, then this will not be approved since the recoupment period is 40 months. $5,000 divided by $125 a month in savings = 40.

The Department of Veterans Affairs would say the last scenario has closing costs that are too high and an insufficient monthly savings for a VA refinance loan.

It is important to realize that the Department of Veterans Affairs has this recoupment period limit of 36 months when considering your VA refinance.

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Credit Score Simulator

September 26th, 2020
credit cards

A Credit Score Simulator can help with “What If” scenarios to determine what you could potentially do to raise your credit score. It can also show you what could negatively impact your credit score. It is important to see how your credit choices might affect your credit score because your credit score will impact the underwriting of your loan, your interest rate quote, and even the cost of your mortgage insurance.

Some of the various things a Credit Score Simulator can measure to see how they will impact your credit score are: Read the rest of this entry »

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6 Tips on Choosing a Mortgage Lender or Broker

April 10th, 2020
bad versus good

People spend a  lot of time looking for the perfect home. There are the countless hours spent poring over real estate listings, the weekend trips to open houses, and the days of driving with your realtor from showing to showing. However, choosing a mortgage lender or broker is often treated as an afterthought—many buyers simply go with their own bank or a broker/lender recommended by their realtor without researching competitive rates and looking for lenders who will also educate them.

This is a critical mistake. Read the rest of this entry »

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Did The Coronavirus Make Mortgage Rates Go Down? Did the Federal Reserve Just Cut Mortgage Rates To 0%?

March 20th, 2020
interest rates are up

Mortgage rates did indeed go down after the Coronavirus spread and financial markets started to panic. But the Coronavirus and mortgage rates aren’t directly connected.

People considering a refinance continue to contact me for low rates, but now that rates have spiked it may no longer makes sense.

The recent mortgage rate reductions we saw may be gone for a period of time, but the rate changes are not as drastic as the media made it sound. Read the rest of this entry »

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Latest Bond Market Report

January 17th, 2020
bond market report

The 10 Year Treasury Bond was at 1.822% on January 10th 2020.

It was 1.847% as of October 28th 2019.

So you can see that rates have been fairly flat for the last 2+ months.

The 10 Year Treasury Bond is not a direct correlation to mortgage rates. It is simply good to know historical information on Treasury bond rates.

Read the rest of this entry »

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Latest Bond Market Report

October 30th, 2019
bond market report

The 10 Year Treasury Bond was around 1.8% as of October 28th 2019.

 

The 10 Year Treasury Bond is not a direct correlation to mortgage rates. It is simply good to know historical information on treasury bond rates.

 

On August 2nd 2019 the 10 Year Treasury Bond was 1.846%.

 

On September 3rd 2019 the 10 Year Treasury Bond was 1.461%.

 

Below are some interesting historical numbers:

In 2018 the average yield of the 10 Year Treasury Bond was 2.91%.

In 2017 the average yield of the 10 Year Treasury Bond was 2.33%.

In 2007 the average yield of the 10 Year Treasury Bond was 4.63%.

In 1997 the average yield of the 10 Year Treasury Bond was 6.35%.

In 1987 the average yield of the 10 Year Treasury Bond was 7.18%.

In 1977 the average yield of the 10 Year Treasury Bond was 7.42%.

 

Where is the 10 Year Treasury Bond headed next? Stay tuned!

 

*The source for these numbers comes from:

https://www.macrotrends.net/2016/10-year-treasury-bond-rate-yield-chart

and

https://www.marketwatch.com/investing/bond/tmubmusd10y?countrycode=bx

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The Best Mortgage Rates

August 17th, 2019
fifty percent off

Often a client will start a mortgage loan conversation with, “I need to get the best rates.” And that often confuses me. What does the “best rates” mean? Does that mean you won’t work with a lender who doesn’t have the very lowest interest rate on the day you are ready to lock-in an interest rate? Does it mean you won’t give any consideration to experience, execution, responsiveness and delivery?

 

Would most people work with a mortgage lender willing to lose money? Read the rest of this entry »

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Latest Bond Market Report

June 16th, 2019
bond market report

The 10 Year Treasury Bond was at 2.08% as of last Friday*. This is the lowest it has been in a long time.

QUESTION: But what does this mean for mortgage rates?

ANSWER: In general, mortgage rates are flat recently, but down over the last few months.

QUESTION: Do mortgage rates rise and fall in lockstep with the 10 Year Treasury Bond?

ANSWER: No.

QUESTION: What variables affect mortgage rate quotes.

ANSWER: Loan size, loan type, property type, credit score, down payment, debt ratios, and more.

 

Where are the 10 Year Treasury Bond, and more importantly mortgage rates, headed next? Check back here to see!

 

*The source for the 10 Year Treasury Bond quote comes from here: https://www.marketwatch.com/investing/bond/tmubmusd10y?countrycode=bx

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Bond Market Report

April 21st, 2019
bond market report

 

The 10 Year Treasury Bond is at 2.56% as of last Friday. This is about the same as the last time I posted 10 Year Treasury Bond data in early January.

On 01-03-2019 the 10 Year Treasury Bond was 2.55%.

The 10 Year Treasury Bond is not a direct correlation to mortgage rates. It is simply a good to know historical information on treasury bond rates.

Below are some interesting historical numbers*:

In 2018 the average yield of the 10 Year Treasury Bond was 2.91%.

In 2017 the average yield of the 10 Year Treasury Bond was 2.33%.

In 2007 the average yield of the 10 Year Treasury Bond was 4.63%.

In 1997 the average yield of the 10 Year Treasury Bond was 6.35%.

In 1987 the average yield of the 10 Year Treasury Bond was 7.18%.

In 1977 the average yield of the 10 Year Treasury Bond was 7.42%.

Where is the 10 Year Treasury Bond headed next? 

 

*The source for these numbers comes from: https://www.macrotrends.net/2016/10-year-treasury-bond-rate-yield-chart

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